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Podiatrist - Cromwell
162 West St Ste K
Cromwell, CT 06416

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By Feet First Foot Care Specialists
May 17, 2021
Category: skin conditions

Memorial Day weekend—the official kickoff of summer—is almost here, and at Feet First Foot Care Specialists, we know it’s an excellent time to recognize Skin Cancer Awareness Month. We want to share some helpful information about skin cancer with our Middlesex County patients before they begin enjoying beach and pool days.

 

Check Skin Regularly-Don't Forget Feet
 

Skin cancer is the most prevalent form of cancer. More people are diagnosed with skin cancer in the United States each year than all other kinds of cancer combined. However, it’s also among the most treatable forms of the disease. The 5-year survival rate for melanoma is 99% if caught and treated early.

Early detection is one of the best weapons available in the fight against skin cancer. That’s why doctors recommend you examine the skin on your body carefully once a month and have a dermatologist exam annually. Many patients forget to think about the skin on their feet when it comes to skin cancer, but it is just as vulnerable to the harmful effects of UV rays as that on the rest of your body. There is an easy guide to looking for potentially harmful moles, freckles, and pigmented spots on your skin when examining your feet.

 

Use the A-B-C-D-E method to detect changes that may indicate developing skin cancer:

  • A—Asymmetry: if you were to draw a line down the center of the spot, the two sides do not look the same.
  • B—Border: potentially cancerous spots can have irregular, scalloped, or no clearly defined borders.
  • C—Color: mole appears to have several colors or shade in it, such as red, blue, white or tan, brown and black; colors may be mottled.
  • D—Diameter: anything over 6mm or about the width of a pencil eraser.
  • E—Evolving: the spot appears to be changing in size, shape, or color since the last time you examined it or is markedly different from other spots you have.


When you look over your feet, be sure to examine the entire foot, including between your toes and your toenails. If you notice any of the above changes or are unsure about a 'spot, it’s best to contact our Cromwell office by calling 860-632-5499 to arrange an appointment with our experienced podiatrist, Dr. Adam Mucinskas, to determine if further evaluation is required.

By Feet First Foot Care Specialists
November 02, 2020
Category: skin conditions
Tags: foot health   foot skin care  

November is National Healthy Skin Month, and at Feet First Foot Care Specialists, we know the skin on your feet has some special needs, and taking good care of it is very important. Skin disorders on your feet can make it challenging to get around. They can also signal trouble in other parts of your body. But often people don’t think to look at their feet! So, the first tip is to get in the habit of inspecting your feet regularly, and if you notice anything abnormal or concerning about the skin on your feet, contact our Cromwell office by calling: (860) 632-5499 promptly. That way, our podiatrist, Dr. Adam Mucinskas, can take a look and determine if a skin issue is developing that needs treatment.

Here are six other ways to take good care of the skin on your feet:

  1. Wear shoes that fit correctly. If your shoes are too small or stretched and worn out, you have an increased chance of irritating your skin and causing blisters to form.

  2. Wash your feet every day. It will go a long way toward lowering your risk of infections.

  3. Keep skin dry. Feet stuck in wet socks and shoes are the perfect breeding ground for fungal infections like athlete’s foot. Consider using a foot powder or antiperspirant on the soles of your feet if you tend to sweat profusely. Keep an extra pair of socks with you and change whenever you notice your feet feel damp.

  4. Don’t ignore toe defects. Patients with bunions, hammertoes, and other abnormal toe structures are more likely to develop corns and calluses on the skin of their feet. These are progressive conditions. Get them treated in their earliest stages to prevent skin and other foot problems.

  5. Keep feet covered. It is particularly important in public places with lots of foot traffic like community pools, gyms, and nail salons. Don’t share items that touch another person’s feet. It will significantly lessen your chances of getting warts and other foot infections.

  6. Moisturize your skin after you shower. It will help lock moisture into the skin on your feet and prevent peeling and skin cracks.

For more information on foot skin conditions and how to prevent them, contact us, Feet First Foot Care Specialists (860) 632-5499.

By Feet First Foot Care Specialists, LLC
August 07, 2019
Category: skin conditions

Psoriasis is a disease that appears as a skin condition on your legs and feet (as well as on other parts of your body). August is Psoriasis Action Month and we at Feet First Foot Care Specialists want our patients to know more about this disorder and how to spot it.

Do: recognize the seriousness of psoriasis. Although it appears as a skin problem, psoriasis is actually caused by a dysfunctional immune system. Patients with this chronic disease produce new skin cells which surface far too rapidly, and that results in thick patches of inflamed skin. Some patients will also develop psoriatic arthritis which causes pain and inflammation in the joints. For your feet, ankles and toes, this can be particularly debilitating.

Do: know the symptoms of psoriasis. There are several types of psoriasis, each of which may look different. The most common symptoms include thickened patches of skin with red, white or a silverish- gray appearance. It can show up on one or two small spots or it can be widespread. These skin patches can be itchy and become painful over time.

Don’t: delay making an appointment at our Cromwell office calling: (860) 632-5499 so that our podiatrist, Dr. Adam Mucinskas, can evaluate any skin symptoms you are experiencing. Oftentimes patients mistake psoriasis for a case of athlete’s foot or another fungal infection.

Do: check your fingernails for signs of psoriasis as well. Practice proper nail care: keep nails trimmed short and straight across and file away rough edges to prevent injury. Injury can be a trigger for a psoriasis flare-up.

Don’t: be concerned about “catching” psoriasis from another person. It is not contagious. Scientists believe that psoriasis sufferers have a genetic predisposition for the condition that is then activated by exposure to certain triggers. Known triggers include certain medications, stress, skin injury and infection. Not all triggers affect patients similarly.

If you have additional questions about psoriasis and your feet, contact us.

By Feet First Foot Care Specialists, LLC
May 15, 2019
Category: skin conditions
Tags: feet   skin cancer   melanoma   sunscreen  

As soon as temperatures begin to go up in Middlesex County, we at Feet First Foot Care Specialists know that patients can’t wait to shed their socks and start wearing sandals and other open styles of footwear. May is Skin Cancer Awareness Month and a good time to share some facts about this disease, which can occur on the skin of your feet. Below are some common myths and why you shouldn’t believe them.

MYTH: Skin cancer is a relatively minor form of cancer.

FACT: Skin cancer is actually the most prevalent form of cancer with over 5 million new cases being diagnosed each year. Deaths from melanoma, an aggressive form of skin cancer, are expected to increase by 22% in 2019.

MYTH: Skin cancer isn’t normally found on your feet.

FACT: The skin on your feet is just as susceptible to skin cancer as the skin on the rest of your body. For this reason, it is necessary to take the same precautions from the sun and to engage in the same level of vigilance with regard to performing self-exams on your feet. In fact, skin cancers on the soles of the feet or between the toes are often not diagnosed until a later stage of the disease. Patients don’t think to examine that part of their body for potential signs of skin cancer.

MYTH: Indoor tanning beds are okay as long as you use sunscreen.

FACT: Indoor tanning beds cause more cases of skin cancer than smoking causes cases of lung cancer. UV radiation is a proven carcinogen. People who have used tanning beds in the past have a 67% increased risk of developing skin cancer in the future.

MYTH: I only need to apply sunscreen to my feet if I am spending a day at the pool or beach.

FACT: Sunscreen should be applied to your feet any time they will be exposed to the sun for a prolonged period of time. Even a day of running errands or sight-seeing while wearing sandals or flip flops will expose your skin to the harmful UV rays of the sun. Apply a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or higher about 30 minutes before going out. On beach or pool days, reapply every two hours (to tops and bottoms of your feet) and after swimming.

If you notice any unusual freckles or spots on your skin, or if a mole you’ve had for a while appears to be changing, contact our Cromwell office by calling: (860) 632-5499 so that our podiatrist Dr. Adam Mucinskas can evaluate your symptoms.

By Feet First Foot Care Specialists, LLC
October 30, 2018
Category: skin conditions

A blister is a patch of skin filled up with clear fluids that occur on your heels, toes, or anywhere else on your foot. By themselves, they’re not necessarily dangerous unless they become infected. One way that people often introduce infection is through popping. That’s why we here at Feet First Foot Care Specialists recommend you leave blisters alone!

What causes blisters?

Blisters can be caused by rubbing or friction and form as the result of your skin trying to protect itself. When something begins to run against your foot and damage it, your skin reacts by creating a protective barrier from the friction element. Friction can start between your feet and socks or shoes, or something else like sports equipment. For instance, a bike pedal can cause a blister during a long ride.

If you notice that the skin on your foot is red and warm, that’s a good indicator that a blister is about to form there. Next, a bump will form and fill with fluid.

How do I prevent blisters?

  • Synthetic socks that are designed to wick away sweat and other moisture can help.
  • Always ensure you have properly-fitting shoes. Friction and rubbing from shoes that are too tight or too loose can easily cause blisters.
  • Tape up your toes that seem to get blisters frequently before starting a sport or activity.

How do I treat blisters?

The best thing to do is leave it alone. Keep a close watch on it, but leave it alone as much as possible. If you notice that the skin surrounding the blister is red, warm, and tender, or if you notice red streaks leading to or from the blister, you likely have an infection. Give us a call as soon as you can if you notice these symptoms.

When the blister does break on its own, use warm water and soap to clean the area. Try not to remove the patch of skin that burst, since that patch is protecting the new skin growing underneath. Dab on a little antibiotic ointment and a bandage, and you’re good to go!

If you’ve got a blister that is large and painful or seems infected, make an appointment today at Feet First Foot Care Specialists! Dr. Adam Mucinskas keeps up to date on all the latest podiatric health issues and utilizes state-of-the-art diagnostics and treatment techniques. Please give us a call today to schedule an appointment at our conveniently located office in the Cromwell, Connecticut area: (860) 632-5499.



 








 

 

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162 West St Ste K
Cromwell, CT 06416