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Podiatrist - Cromwell
162 West St Ste K
Cromwell, CT 06416

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Posts for tag: Athlete's foot

By Feet First Foot Care Specialists, LLC
July 07, 2020
Category: Foot conditions

At Feet First Foot Care, we’re hearing from many of our Middlesex County patients that they are taking up the sport of running. The pandemic has made some people re-think their fitness plans, and running while maintaining safe social distance and avoiding venues where there are many other people. We applaud our patients for making regular exercise a priority but also want to help protect them from some podiatric problems that runners often face.

Here are some common injuries and disorders associated with running and how to prevent them:

  1. Achilles Tendonitis—this inflammation of the long tendon that runs along the back of your lower leg from calf to heel is especially common in new runners or those who are becoming active again after a long period of inactivity. Being overly enthusiastic and jumping into long, intense runs without the proper conditioning can result in severe pain to the Achilles tendon. Running hills and sprints can also increase the risk of this condition. Start slowly and increase the pace and duration gradually. Be sure to include stretches for the calves in your warm-ups and cooldowns.

  2. Ankle Sprains—landing the wrong way on your foot and twisting an ankle can happen when you run. If you have chronic weak ankles, be sure the running shoes you purchase will provide firm ankle support. Choose a place to run such as a school track, that is unlikely to have holes, divots, or debris that can cause an ankle-twisting to occur.

  3. Athlete’s Foot—you may not associate fungal infection with running.  However, your feet will be spending regular time in a moist, dark, warm place (your sneakers!), and those are the perfect breeding conditions for bacteria and fungi. Don’t wear the same pair of socks for more than one day and air out your shoes between runs. Practice good basic hygiene and wash your feet daily. Use an antifungal or foot powder if foot odor is a problem.

  4. Heel Pain—the repetitive pressure your heels experience when running can result in pain. If you have flat feet or a tendency to overpronate, you may also have an inflammation of the plantar fascia on the bottom of your foot, which can also lead to heel pain. Additional arch support or a custom orthotic may help.

The bottom line is if you experience any acute or ongoing pain or discomfort after you start a running program, it’s essential that you contact our Cromwell office by calling (860) 632-5499 so that our podiatrist, Dr. Adam Mucinskas, can examine your feet and determine the source of the discomfort before a worse injury occurs.

By Feet First Foot Care Specialists, LLC
September 25, 2019
Category: foot safety

At Feet First Foot Care Specialists, we know many of our young patients are enjoying fall sports. There are many benefits to sports including learning how to be part of a team and getting regular physical activity. It can also be a cause of several foot and ankle problems, however. Below are six tips for ensuring that your child enjoys a safe sports season.

  1. Start the season with new shoes. Each sport requires specific movements of the feet. Today’s shoes are designed to protect feet and maximize performance. Get sports shoes that are made for the sport your child is doing and get them professionally fitted.
  2. Sock choice matters. Choose socks that provide some degree of cushioning and that also wick moisture away from the skin. Sweaty, damp feet are more likely to develop fungal infections. Be sure to bring the socks you plan to use to the shoe store and try on with the sports shoes you are buying.
  3. Insist on safe surfaces. Fields with divots and holes and tracks or courts with cracks in the asphalt are all risks to the health and safety of your child. If playing areas need attention, bring it up with the school or town to prevent ankle sprains and other injuries.
  4. Avoid athlete’s foot in the locker room. Make sure your child has a pair of flip flops or shower shoes to wear in the gym shower. Remind them not to share towels or soap either.
  5. Give it a rest. When children play a sport in every season and do not allow developing bones, muscles and ligaments a break, overuse injuries such as Sever’s disease are more likely to occur.
  6. Get pain checked out promptly. If your child sustains an injury on the field or complains of ongoing pain after practices, be sure to make an appointment at our Cromwell office. Our podiatrist Dr. Adam Mucinskas can examine your child’s feet and ankles and determine the best course of treatment.
By Feet First Foot Care Specialists, LLC
August 07, 2019
Category: skin conditions

Psoriasis is a disease that appears as a skin condition on your legs and feet (as well as on other parts of your body). August is Psoriasis Action Month and we at Feet First Foot Care Specialists want our patients to know more about this disorder and how to spot it.

Do: recognize the seriousness of psoriasis. Although it appears as a skin problem, psoriasis is actually caused by a dysfunctional immune system. Patients with this chronic disease produce new skin cells which surface far too rapidly, and that results in thick patches of inflamed skin. Some patients will also develop psoriatic arthritis which causes pain and inflammation in the joints. For your feet, ankles and toes, this can be particularly debilitating.

Do: know the symptoms of psoriasis. There are several types of psoriasis, each of which may look different. The most common symptoms include thickened patches of skin with red, white or a silverish- gray appearance. It can show up on one or two small spots or it can be widespread. These skin patches can be itchy and become painful over time.

Don’t: delay making an appointment at our Cromwell office calling: (860) 632-5499 so that our podiatrist, Dr. Adam Mucinskas, can evaluate any skin symptoms you are experiencing. Oftentimes patients mistake psoriasis for a case of athlete’s foot or another fungal infection.

Do: check your fingernails for signs of psoriasis as well. Practice proper nail care: keep nails trimmed short and straight across and file away rough edges to prevent injury. Injury can be a trigger for a psoriasis flare-up.

Don’t: be concerned about “catching” psoriasis from another person. It is not contagious. Scientists believe that psoriasis sufferers have a genetic predisposition for the condition that is then activated by exposure to certain triggers. Known triggers include certain medications, stress, skin injury and infection. Not all triggers affect patients similarly.

If you have additional questions about psoriasis and your feet, contact us.

By Feet First Foot Care Specialists, LLC
July 24, 2019
Category: foot health

At Feet First Foot Care Specialists, we hope that you are planning to get away at some point this summer. Wherever your summer vacation destination is, there are some items you should take with you to ensure the health and safety of your feet. Below are our suggestions for what to pack:

  1. Comfortable walking shoes—even if your plan is to lie out on the beach all day, you’ll need to get to and from your vacation destination. Travel days tend to be tough on the feet as you rush to catch flights or haul luggage in and out of the car. Walking shoes that have good arch support and that you’ve worn many times already will also be helpful for sightseeing and shopping days.
  2. Moleskin—sweating creates friction and can increase the risk of developing blisters. A small piece of self-adhesive moleskin applied to a sore spot can stop a blister before it starts, and allow you to continue enjoying your vacation in comfort.
  3. Flip-flops—although not recommended for all-day use on your vacation, a pair of flip-flops or shower shoes are the best way to protect your feet from athlete’s foot and other fungal infections at the pool or in ocean or lakeside changing areas and restrooms.
  4. Orthotics—if our podiatrist Dr. Adam Mucinskas has prescribed a custom orthotic to correct a foot problem, don’t take a holiday from wearing it while you’re away. Leaving your orthotic at home may result in a painful vacation for your feet.
  5. Water bottle—excessive amounts of walking and warm, humid weather can lead to edema or swelling of the feet and ankles. Swelling can be very uncomfortable and also makes your shoes tighter, which means a greater likelihood of blisters. Drinking lots of water is one of the easiest ways to eliminate excess fluids from your body and it’s good for you too!

If despite all your best efforts you return from vacation with foot or ankle pain, a rash or other suspicious symptom, contact our Cromwell office for an appointment by calling (860) 632-5499.

By Feet First Foot Care Specialists, LLC
July 01, 2019
Category: foot fungus
Tags: Athlete's foot   barefoot   hygiene   fungus  

At Feet First Foot Care Specialists, we find that each season brings its own unique podiatric challenges. During the summer months, we see more cases of athlete’s foot. Why? It’s a fungal infection that is spread by direct contact. At this time of the year more people are going barefoot and that’s the perfect way to pick up a case of athlete’s foot.

Below are some do’s and don’ts for preventing athlete’s foot:

Do: practice good basic foot hygiene. Wash your feet daily with soap and warm water. Afterwards, dry your feet thoroughly. Be especially sure to dry the spaces between your toes as this is often where athlete’s foot begins.

Don’t: go barefoot in public places. Wear flip flops or shower shoes when you are at the nail salon, town pool, gym or using the rest rooms or changing facilities at a lake or beach.

Do: have an extra pair of socks handy if your feet tend to sweat profusely. Change your socks as soon as your feet feel moist. Consider buying socks made of material that wicks moisture away from your skin if this is an ongoing issue.

Do: wear shoes that are made of natural materials and allow your feet to breathe. Good air circulation around your feet will be helpful.

Don’t: wear the same pair of shoes every day. Alternate footwear to give shoes a chance to air out.

Do: dust feet with an anti-fungal or talcum powder each morning to aid in keeping them dry.

Don’t: share shoes, towels, emery boards or other items that other people use on their feet.

Seek Treatment Early

In addition to itching, signs of athlete’s foot include: red skin that’s dry and scaling, blisters and oozing. If you notice any of these symptoms, you should contact our Cromwell office and have our podiatrist, Dr. Adam Mucinskas, take a look at your feet. Without treatment, athlete’s foot can spread to other parts of your body and to other people.



 








 

 

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162 West St Ste K
Cromwell, CT 06416