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Podiatrist - Cromwell
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Cromwell, CT 06416

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In October, we at Feet First Foot Care Specialists recognize Raynaud’s Awareness Month. Raynaud’s disease is a widespread disease but is not well known. Raynaud's (ray-NOSE) disease causes some areas of your body — such as your fingers and toes — to feel numb and cold in response to cold temperatures or stress. In Raynaud's disease, smaller arteries that supply blood to your skin become narrow, limiting blood flow to affected areas. Treatment of Raynaud's disease depends on its severity and whether you have other health conditions. For most people, Raynaud's disease isn't disabling, but it can affect your quality of life. In this article, we will be sharing everything you need to know about Raynaud’s Disease. 

Diagnosis

To tell the difference between primary and secondary Raynaud's, your doctor might do a test called nailfold capillaroscopy. During the test, the doctor looks at the skin at the base of your fingernail under a microscope or magnifier to look for deformities or swelling of the tiny blood vessels.

Signs and Symptoms

Raynaud's syndrome causes spasms in small blood vessels in your fingers and toes. This limits blood flow and leads to symptoms like skin color changes, cold skin, and a pins and needles sensation. Common triggers of Raynaud's attacks include cold weather and stress. The most common signs and symptoms of Raynaud’s Disease are:

  • Cold fingers or toes
  • Color changes in your skin in response to cold or stress
  • Numb, prickly feeling or stinging pain upon warming or stress relief

Pain

Raynaud's phenomenon is a condition where blood flow to your fingers, toes, ears, or nose is restricted or interrupted. Also known as Raynaud's syndrome, it occurs when the blood vessels in your hands or feet constrict. Episodes of constriction are called vasospasm. Although Raynaud's most commonly affects your fingers and toes, it can also affect other areas of your body, such as your nose, lips, and ears. After you warm up, the return of normal blood flow to the area can take 15 minutes.

Age

Raynaud’s Disease is usually diagnosed in people between the ages of 35 and 40. Women are more likely than men to have Raynaud's disease, also known as Raynaud's or Raynaud's phenomenon or syndrome. It appears to be more common in people who live in colder climates.

When To See a Podiatrist

To schedule an appointment at our Cromwell, Connecticut office call (860)-632-5499 or visit our website for more information.

By Feet First Foot Care Specialists, LLC
September 06, 2022
Category: Back Pain, Feet

Our bodies are like a chain with one link. Think about what would happen if the first link in the chain was out of position. The point at which it meets the next link would eventually overstress that link and adversely affect the entire chain. That old song, “The leg bones connected to the thigh bone. The thigh bones connected to the hip bone…,” tells the whole story. If you have been suffering from foot pain and discomfort for a long time, it could affect the rest of your body. If you are changing the way you walk to avoid foot discomfort, this could lead to back pain- and vice versa. 

The Connection Between the Lower Back and Foot

The sciatic nerve is a large nerve that begins near the base of the spine, extending downward through the lower extremities, traveling through the hips, buttocks, and legs, before ending in the feet near the toes. If a nerve root in the lower back is irritated or compressed, it can cause pain to radiate along the sciatic nerve to the patient’s foot. The sciatic nerve is what sends the commands which allow for basic movements, such as walking and sitting. When this nerve becomes constricted, inflamed, or compressed in the lumbar spine, often due to degenerative spine conditions that develop in the lower back, the set of symptoms is known as “sciatica.”

Common Symptoms

  • Pain
  • Numbness
  • Tingling
  • Weakness
  • Slower reflexes
  • Muscle spasms

Common Causes

Common Treatment Options

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort in your feet, schedule an appointment at Feet First Foot Care Specialists. Our podiatrist Dr. Adam Mucinskas is board-certified and treats a wide range of conditions. To schedule an appointment, call our Cromwell, Connecticut office at (860)-632-5499 or visit our website.

Poor circulation in the lower extremities is often caused by underlying diseases such as peripheral artery disease (PAD), and a linked condition called atherosclerosis. PAD is a condition that causes the blood vessels and arteries to narrow. When the blood vessels and arteries begin to narrow, they stiffen up due to a build-up of plaque, which links to atherosclerosis. Both of these conditions cause a decrease in the amount of blood that can flow to your lower extremities. Treatment for poor circulation often depends on the underlying condition that causes it. 

Causes

Lack of oxygen from poor blood circulation restricts muscle growth and development. It can also cause:

  • Muscle pain, stiffness, or weakness  
  • Numbness or cramping in the legs
  • Skin discoloration
  • Slower nail & hair growth
  • Erectile dysfunction

Those who have diabetes, smoke, or are over the age of 50 are at higher risk for developing symptoms of poor circulation in the lower extremities. If you are experiencing any symptoms of poor circulation in your feet, ankles, or lower legs, make an appointment with board-certified podiatrist Dr. Adam Mucinskas for an examination.

Symptoms

Some of the most common symptoms of poor circulation are:

  • Numbness
  • Tingling
  • Throbbing or stinging pain in limbs
  • Pain
  • Muscle Cramps

Treatment

You can try to improve the circulation in your feet and legs by:

  • Exercise. Regular movement can increase the blood and oxygen your muscles receive.
  • Cutting your salt intake. This will reduce fluid retention (which restricts circulation).
  • Eating foods that are rich in omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3 fatty acids help prevent blood platelets from clumping together
  • Try to alternate positions throughout the day. Sitting or standing for too long can also cause poor circulation in your feet and ankles.
  • Avoid wearing high heels. Shoes that do not provide the right support can also interrupt blood flow to the feet and toes.
  • See your podiatrist. A podiatrist can examine and evaluate your feet and ankles to find the cause of your pain. They will also assist you in finding a daily regime that works well for you and your condition. To make an appointment at our Middlesex County office, please call (860)-632-5499 or visit our website for more information.


 








 

 

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162 West St Ste K
Cromwell, CT 06416