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Podiatrist - Cromwell
162 West St Ste K
Cromwell, CT 06416

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By Feet First Foot Care Specialists, LLC
November 28, 2022
Category: senior foot care

As we enter the winter months, our lower extremities need more attention, and unfortunately, because our feet are hidden, they are most often forgotten about or overlooked. Our specialists at Feet First Foot Care LLC want to remind our senior patients to care for their feet with love and care through every stage of life. The foot-care routine we recommend for our senior patients is different than what we recommend for the rest of our patients. This is because every senior patient has a unique history, and therefore a unique treatment plan for their foot and ankle problems. In this blog article, we will myth bust senior foot care. 

Do: Inspect feet regularly. Look for cuts, redness, swelling, blisters, sores, and any changes to nails or skin. Featured on our website, is a patient education section where we share further tips and tricks for senior foot care!

Don’t: Put off getting foot pain evaluated. It’s not normal for your feet to hurt if you’re a senior. The sooner you are able to seek help and get treatment for foot and ankle discomfort, the better the chances are that more serious foot complications will not develop.

Do: Keep the blood flowing. As you get older, your blood circulation to your feet can be diminished. To encourage proper circulation:

  • When sitting, prop your feet up.
  • When sitting for extended periods, wiggle your toes occasionally.
  • Stretch daily.
  • Massage your feet regularly.

Don’t: Forget to moisturize! Seniors need to keep their feet moisturized to avoid itching, cracking, and calluses. Always use gentle soap and put on lotion after your bath or shower.

Do: Get regular foot checkups from your podiatrist. Your podiatrist can identify problems like hammertoe, bunions, neuromas, ingrown toenails, warts, or wounds before they turn into more serious problems.

Don’t: Let your feet sit in wet or cold shoes/socks. Make sure your feet aren’t moist before you put your shoes on and change your socks on a regular basis. We recommend to our senior patients in the winter to always wear warm, dry, and protective boots and to keep an extra pair of warm, dry socks handy if you go out.

To schedule an appointment with our board-certified podiatrist Dr. Adam Mucinskas DPM, call our Cromwell, Connecticut office at (860)-632-5499 or visit our website for more information. 

By Feet First Foot Care Specialists, LLC
November 22, 2022

Don’t let sore, achy feet ruin your holiday season. Last week, the experts at Feet First Foot Care LLC shared with patients about ways they can give thanks to their feet this holiday season. This week our experts wanted to share ways in which you can help your feet prepare for the increase in activities that are waiting for each of us over the next 2 months. Tis’ the season for our feet to work overtime as we shop, bake, and spend time with our loved ones. 

Here is how you can maintain foot health and support your feet during the holiday season: 

  • Wear Properly Fitting Shoes. When hitting the dance floor and shopping malls this season, don’t compromise comfort and safety. Protect your feet from blisters, calluses and ankle injuries by wearing supportive shoes for the occasion.
  • Don’t Overindulge in Holiday Cheer. Your feet can feel the effects of too much holiday cheer—overindulging in certain foods and beverages high in uric acid can cause painful gout attacks in your feet.
  • Take Safety Precautions If You Get a Pedicure. Reduce your risk of bacterial infections during your holiday pedicure by choosing a salon that follows proper sanitation practices and is licensed by the state.
  • Listen To Your Feet. Don’t let foot pain ruin your holiday fun; inspect your feet regularly for any evidence of ingrown toenails, bruising, swelling, blisters or calluses. If you have any issues, contact your foot and ankle surgeon.
  • Exercise your toes. Toe cramping is a common symptom due to long hours of standing and walking, often in tight shoes. Avoid toe cramping by stretching your toes upwards, pointing and curling them for five seconds in each direction, then repeat 10 times. Do this before wearing your shoes for extended periods. You can do this several times a day and you won't even break a sweat -- but your toes will get good relief.
  • Elevate your legs. Long hours of standing, walking and even sitting can cause the feet to swell, especially at the end of the day. Reduce swelling by elevating the legs when sitting or lying down. Be sure to lift the legs above the level of your heart.
  • Get help – Feet shouldn’t hurt all the time. Persistent foot pain can be an indication of injury, irritation, or illness. To schedule an appointment with Dr. Adam Mucinskas at our Cromwell, Connecticut office call (860)-632-5499  or visit our website for more information.
By Feet First Foot Care Specialists, LLC
November 16, 2022
Category: Foot Care

As we reflect on the year, we are giving thanks for several things, for we are grateful. But have you considered giving your feet gratitude as well? There are some basic things you can do for your feet right away. The first thing you can do is buy proper shoes if you currently do not have shoes that properly fit. Wearing uncomfortable shoes that do not fit well can lead to numerous foot and ankle problems, as well as foot injuries and, over time, even foot deformities. If you would like to give extra gratitude for your feet this Thanksgiving season but are unsure where to start or what to do, this blog article is for you! 

Our specialists at Feet First Foot Care Specialists, LLC recommend starting here:

  • Try this simple quiz from The Foot Health Foundation of America that helps to pinpoint any warning signs of foot and ankle problems.
  • Follow these general guidelines to assess how healthy your feet are.
  • Follow these basic foot care guidelines and try to do them every day.

How To Give Thanks to Your Feet

  • T-Treat your feet to a safe and clean pedicure.
  • H-Help yourself to nutritious foods with calcium, vitamin D, and antioxidants. All of which promote optimal foot health!
  • A-Apply a rich moisturizer, to help prevent dry skin and cracked heels. It is especially important as it gets colder.
  • N-Note any foot pain or changes and make an appointment at our Cromwell, Connecticut office to get treatment.
  • K-Kick back and relax – ask your partner for a foot massage or search the web for a foot massager machine. (This can also make a great holiday gift!) Whatever you choose, make sure you and your feet are relaxed.
  • S-Soak your feet in a warm bath - try using Epsom salt and essential oils!

As you start your holiday shopping, traveling, and spending time with loved ones, don’t forget to give your feet some TLC. The best thing we recommend you can do for your feet is to consult with our board-certified podiatristDr. Adam Mucinskas, if you are experiencing any foot or ankle problems. Make an appointment by calling (860-) 632-5499 or visiting our website

By Feet First Foot Care Specialists, LLC
November 09, 2022
Category: Diabetes

Diabetes is a condition in which your body does not make enough insulin to keep your blood sugar levels steady. Insulin is a hormone that removes sugar (glucose) from your blood when your blood sugar is too high. Diabetes is the seventh cause of death in the United States, while the rest of the world has a much higher mortality rate. This is especially true in middle- to low-income countries, as these countries are often unable to access proper treatment for this condition. About 90-95 percent of people in the United States with diabetes have Type 2, while about 5 percent have Type 1, and the remainder has gestational diabetes. People with diabetes can still live well in spite of their condition! 

Lifestyle Changes for Diabetes

  1. Eat Slower.
  2. Pay Attention to Portion Sizes.
  3. Drink Plenty of Water Every day.
  4. Switch to Whole Grains.
  5. Avoid Smoking and/or Secondhand Smoke.
  6. Limit Alcohol Consumption.
  7. Plan Your Meals Ahead.
  8. Keep Track of Your Steps and Fitness Progress.
  9. Take Care of Your Feet.
  10.  Get A Full Night’s Sleep.

Recipes and Nutrition for Diabetes

It is not always easy to follow a rigid schedule. Especially when it comes to eating. But when it comes to managing your diabetes or prediabetes, following an eating plan is a powerful tool. Eating right does not have to be boring! Find a balance that works for you. These delicious recipes below may help:

Finding Support for Diabetes

Diabetes doesn’t have to be scary, and it doesn’t have to run or ruin your life. If you have been experiencing pain or discomfort in your lower extremities or think you could be at risk for diabetes, call our Cromwell, Connecticut office at (860)-632-5499  to schedule an appointment with our podiatrist Dr. Adam Mucinskas or visit our website for more information.

Wintertime can be quite harsh on our feet. Our feet go from warm, centrally heated houses to arctic conditions outside. Temperature changes take their toll on the skin, making the skin dry and prone to cracking open. Dry and cracked skin are the two conditions most people experience on their feet when it starts to get colder. Paying close attention to the skin on our feet and actively preventing major skin concerns is the most effective way to care for our feet during the cold-weather months. 

The most common skin concerns for winter are:

  • Dry and cracked skin. This may even worsen as you grow older because your natural oil production decreases and your skin becomes thinner, making you more prone to dryness when the temperatures drop.
  • Fissures is the medical term for the result of severely dry skin. Common symptoms of fissures include feet getting thicker and becoming callused before they bleed and crack, which could lead to infection.
  • Increased pressure. You may experience this while walking in shoes, but it can also cause cracks on the bottoms of your feet. Cracks will typically appear on your heels, where winter boots and shoes rub.
  • Fungal infections. Skin flare-ups affiliated with Raynaud's syndrome may be more common during the winter months which decreases blood flow and can cause fingers and toes to change color. Painful inflammation called chilblains, causes itching, red patches, swelling, and blisters, are other concerns to pay close attention to during the cold-weather months.

Prevention Is the Best Treatment

  • Practice Good Hygiene. Wash your feet thoroughly when you bathe or shower, dry them well, and always put on fresh socks. These precautions can help you prevent toenail fungus, ingrown toenails, and athlete’s foot. Bonus: Bring an extra pair of warm, dry socks with you wherever you go. Just in case!
  • Moisturize. Indoor heating and dry winter air can contribute to dry, cracked skin on your feet and heels. Use a quality moisturizing cream and take a few extra minutes to thoroughly rub the lotion on your feet.
  • Support. Wear the right kind of winter socks to insulate and protect your feet. Also, wear shoes and boots that are roomy and don’t constrict your feet or cut off circulation. For further tips on finding the right winter boots for you, check out our blog!
  • Safety. Fractures go up in winter months, as do falls and ankle dislocations or broken toes. Avoid foot fractures by wearing boots or waterproof shoes with a low heel and a traction sole if there’s a possibility of walking on a slippery surface. Always wear appropriately designed and fitted footwear for sports activities like skiing, snowboarding, or ice skating.
  • Listen To Your Feet. Worried about the health of your feet this winter? Call (860)-632-5499 to schedule an appointment at our Cromwell, Connecticut office with our podiatrist Dr. Adam Mucinskas, or visit our website for more information. 


 








 

 

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162 West St Ste K
Cromwell, CT 06416