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Podiatrist - Cromwell
162 West St Ste K
Cromwell, CT 06416

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As we welcome the new year, many feel motivated to take steps towards self-improvement. Some may begin by improving their daily routines, including increased healthy exercise habits. If you start a new fitness routine, be gentle with yourself, be consistent, and start slowly. Occasionally, heel pain can intensify when you begin a new exercise routine. Don't let heel pain prevent you from moving forward with your 2022 fitness goals. 

Heel pain (plantar fasciitis) may be one of the most common issues seen by podiatrists today. It's a condition in which the band of tissue that stretches from your heel bone to your toes becomes inflamed, torn, or otherwise stressed from overuse. It is vital to get a complete exam and proper diagnosis if you experience heel pain.

Plantar fasciitis heel pain is typically at its worst with your first steps in the morning or after sitting for extended periods. The heel pain feels better sometimes with activity, but you can experience flare-ups when you are on your feet for long hours. 

Certain people have an increased risk of developing plantar fasciitis.

Do you identify with any of the following plantar fasciitis risk categories? 

  • Between the ages of 40-60 
  • Carrying excess weight
  • Have hereditary conditions such as flat feet, high arches, or another underlining mechanical issue with your feet
  • Have tight Achilles tendons
  • An occupation that causes you to be on your feet for long hours
  • Wearing non-supportive shoes or high heels

The longer you have been experiencing the pain of Plantar Fasciitis, the longer it may take to help resolve the pain. 

Often, a multiple point care approach, using the following methods works best to help reduce heel pain:

  • Simple stretches and exercises to strengthen the foot
  • Wear shoes with good arch support and a cushioned heel area
  • Anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen and naproxen
  • Icing your heel several times a day to reduce inflammation
  • Resting 
  • Custom Orthotics made to fit your foot and treat your condition
  • Shock wave Therapy 

To better determine the source of your heel pain and the best course of treatment, schedule a comprehensive foot examination with Feet First Foot Care Specialists podiatristDr. Adam Mucinskas, at our Cromwell, Connecticut office. To schedule your appointment, please call our office at (860) 632-5499. 

At Feet First Foot Care Specialists, we know as our Middlesex County patients switch from summer sandals to fall footwear, the transition may not go as smoothly as we like. Summer shoes tend to be more open and not as constricting as closed styles which become the norm in the fall.

Three common podiatric problems you may see in the fall and what to do about them:

Problem: Athlete’s foot. shoes invite fungal and bacterial infections. With all the barefoot traffic summer sees around swimming pools and in seaside changing areas and restrooms, infections are prevalent. If you’ve started back to the gym, there’s a high likelihood infection is present in communal showers and locker rooms. These dark, moist spaces are the perfect breeding ground for athlete’s foot and toenail fungus.

Solution: Foot infections spread by direct contact. Keeping your feet covered in public places will help prevent you from getting one. Try not to wear the same pair of shoes multiple days in a row. Allow a day or two in between uses for shoes to air out. Choose shoes made of natural, breathable materials.

Problem: Heel Pain. If one of the reasons you hate to see summer end is because you love living in flip-flops, there’s a good chance your heels will be hurting once you go back to regular shoes. That’s because traditional flip-flops do not provide any arch support. It, in turn, aggravates the plantar fascia—a long band of tissue along the bottom of your foot—and causes your heels to hurt.

Solution: Try to gradually transition to traditional shoes, wearing them a few hours a day and increasing usage slowly. You may also need to do some stretching exercises to help decrease inflammation in the plantar fascia.

Problem: Bunion Pain. Ah, it was so nice to wear open-toed shoes that didn’t press on your bunion and make it hurt! Going back to closed-toe styles may mean an increase in the pain and discomfort you experience from your bunions.

Solution: Some additional padding may help to protect a sensitive bunion. You may also have to consider shoes that are a little larger or at least designed with a roomier toe box. It may also be time to have the podiatrist check to see if your bunion progresses to a point where a different treatment plan is necessary.

With all of the above foot problems and any new uncomfortable symptoms you develop, if they persist, it’s best not to put off making an appointment at our Cromwell office by calling 860-632-5499. Our podiatrist, Dr. Adam Mucinskas, will examine your feet and track down the source of your discomfort as well as the best solution to bring you relief.

By Feet First Foot Care Specialists
June 21, 2021
Category: Foot conditions
Tags: foot pain   heel pain   Bursitis  

You notice the back of your heel hurts when you’re walking or running. It’s also a little bit swollen, red, and warm. At Feet First Foot Care Specialists, we recognize these as potential symptoms of bursitis. Many of our Middlesex County patients are not familiar with this condition and how it can affect your feet. Below is some helpful information you should know.

Bursitis Defined

Bursas are tiny, fluid-filled sacs located near a joint, tendon, or bone. Their purpose is to provide some cushioning by reducing friction and acting as a lubricant to the area. Bursitis occurs when the bursa in a particular spot becomes inflamed or irritated. Common areas where bursitis develops in your feet in addition to the heel are the ball of the foot, toes, near the base of your Achilles, or on a bunion.

Causes

Most often, bursitis is the result of repetitive motion or pressure to the affected area. Other contributing factors may include:

  • Improperly fitting shoes
  • Not warming up and stretching sufficiently before exercise
  • Haglund’s deformity (also known as “pump bump,” a bony enlargement that forms on the back of your heel)
  • Underlying medical conditions such as arthritis, diabetes, gout

Diagnosis and Treatment

If you suspect you may have bursitis, it’s important you make an appointment at our Cromwell office by calling 860-632-5499. The symptoms of bursitis are also typical of other podiatric disorders. Our podiatrist, Dr. Adam Mucinskas, will want to conduct a complete physical examination and get your medical history to rule out other possibilities. To confirm a diagnosis of bursitis, the podiatrist may order imaging studies such as x-rays, an MRI, or ultrasound. Sometimes a small amount of fluid will be drawn from the bursa and sent to the lab to be analyzed.

The good news is most patients with bursitis recover using conservative treatment methods. The foot doctor may recommend rest from the activities that are aggravating your bursa. Icing and over-the-counter anti-inflammatory medications may be prescribed to relieve pain. Physical therapy and stretching exercises may also be prescribed.

Don’t suffer unnecessarily. If you are experiencing any pain or other unusual symptoms in your feet, contact us today, 860-632-5499.

By Feet First Foot Care Specialists
November 10, 2020
Category: heel pain

Have you noticed pain in your heels that has been getting progressively worse over the last few months? Do you experience severe or stabbing pain when you first get out of bed? Do you see any swelling on the bottom of your heel? If you answered yes to any of these questions, you might be suffering from a complaint many Middlesex County patients bring to us at Feet First Foot Care Specialists: plantar fasciitis.

Why the Pain?

The plantar fascia is a band of tissue that stretches along the bottom of your foot from your heel to your toes. Initially, it may become irritated and then inflamed, causing both heel and arch pain. Most frequently, this condition’s cause is a defect in the structure of the foot, such as overly high arches or flat feet. But other factors can increase your risk for plantar fasciitis:

  • A job that requires standing for long hours
  • Wearing shoes with inadequate arch support
  • Working on hard, flat surfaces
  • Being overweight

What Can be Done?

If you are suffering from heel pain, don’t delay. Make an appointment at our Cromwell office by calling: (860) 632-5499. If our podiatrist, Dr. Adam Mucinskas, diagnoses plantar fasciitis, several treatment options are available to help relieve pain and correct the problem. These include:

  • Icing—this can help relieve pain and inflammation. Use an ice pack for up to 20 minutes at a time. Wrap in a thin towel; do not apply ice directly to your skin.
  • Medications—nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs like ibuprofen.
  • Avoiding going barefoot—this puts a strain on the plantar fascia.
  • Footwear modifications—choosing styles that have good arch support and a slightly raised heel.
  • Custom orthotics
  • Stretching exercises—calf muscle stretches can help ease pain in some cases.
  • Night splint—keeps the plantar fascia stretched while you sleep, decreasing morning pain.
  • Removable walking cast
  • Physical therapy

If conservative measures are not successful, the foot doctor may recommend surgery. Non-invasive measures are always the first line of treatment, however. If you believe you may have plantar fasciitis, contact us at your earliest convenience for an evaluation.

By Feet First Foot Care Specialists, LLC
July 07, 2020
Category: Foot conditions

At Feet First Foot Care, we’re hearing from many of our Middlesex County patients that they are taking up the sport of running. The pandemic has made some people re-think their fitness plans, and running while maintaining safe social distance and avoiding venues where there are many other people. We applaud our patients for making regular exercise a priority but also want to help protect them from some podiatric problems that runners often face.

Here are some common injuries and disorders associated with running and how to prevent them:

  1. Achilles Tendonitis—this inflammation of the long tendon that runs along the back of your lower leg from calf to heel is especially common in new runners or those who are becoming active again after a long period of inactivity. Being overly enthusiastic and jumping into long, intense runs without the proper conditioning can result in severe pain to the Achilles tendon. Running hills and sprints can also increase the risk of this condition. Start slowly and increase the pace and duration gradually. Be sure to include stretches for the calves in your warm-ups and cooldowns.

  2. Ankle Sprains—landing the wrong way on your foot and twisting an ankle can happen when you run. If you have chronic weak ankles, be sure the running shoes you purchase will provide firm ankle support. Choose a place to run such as a school track, that is unlikely to have holes, divots, or debris that can cause an ankle-twisting to occur.

  3. Athlete’s Foot—you may not associate fungal infection with running.  However, your feet will be spending regular time in a moist, dark, warm place (your sneakers!), and those are the perfect breeding conditions for bacteria and fungi. Don’t wear the same pair of socks for more than one day and air out your shoes between runs. Practice good basic hygiene and wash your feet daily. Use an antifungal or foot powder if foot odor is a problem.

  4. Heel Pain—the repetitive pressure your heels experience when running can result in pain. If you have flat feet or a tendency to overpronate, you may also have an inflammation of the plantar fascia on the bottom of your foot, which can also lead to heel pain. Additional arch support or a custom orthotic may help.

The bottom line is if you experience any acute or ongoing pain or discomfort after you start a running program, it’s essential that you contact our Cromwell office by calling (860) 632-5499 so that our podiatrist, Dr. Adam Mucinskas, can examine your feet and determine the source of the discomfort before a worse injury occurs.



 








 

 

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162 West St Ste K
Cromwell, CT 06416