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Podiatrist - Cromwell
162 West St Ste K
Cromwell, CT 06416

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By Feet First Foot Care Specialists
April 05, 2021

At Feet First Foot Care Specialists, our Middlesex County patients sometimes come to us because of ongoing stiffness and pain in an ankle. It may also include swelling and even difficulty bearing weight on the affected foot. The first thing our podiatrist, Dr. Adam Mucinskas, will likely want to know is if you recently twisted your ankle or suffered another type of ankle injury. If the answer is “no,” he will examine your ankle and conduct any necessary tests to find the source of your discomfort.

3 possible causes of chronic ankle problems:

  1. Osteochondritis—with this condition, lesions form on the ankle bone, causing pain and stiffness. Osteochondritis can affect patients of any age and often traced back to an old ankle injury. Usually, immobilizing the ankle and foot will allow for healing to occur. You may require surgery for more severe cases to remove loose fragments of bone and cartilage and clean up any defects.
  2. Arthritis—if you’re over 50, there’s an increased risk the stiffness and soreness you are experiencing may be arthritis. Osteoarthritis is the result of wear and tear on your joints that occurs as you age. An injury to the ankle in the past may hasten the development of arthritis in the joint. The podiatrist has many possible avenues to help slow the progression of arthritis and improve your symptoms. Physical therapy, custom orthotics, and anti-inflammatory medications can all help. In addition, eating a nutritious diet low in sugars and processed foods and regularly exercising will also make joints healthier.
  3. Chronic Lateral Ankle Pain—the telltale symptom of this disorder is pain outside the ankle. Although the most common reason for chronic lateral ankle pain is a previous ankle sprain, it can be caused by a fracture in one of the bones in the ankle joint, nerve injury, scar tissue, or an inflamed or torn tendon. The treatment will depend in part on the source of the pain. Once that is determined, the foot doctor may prescribe medication, physical therapy, or bracing the ankle. If there’s a fracture, immobilization may be necessary to allow the break to heal.

If you have persistent ankle pain or other symptoms, contact our Cromwell office call 860-632-5499 for an appointment today.

By Feet First Foot Care Specialists
March 29, 2021
Category: Foot Care

Just to be clear, when we at Feet First Foot Care Specialists say, “examine your feet,” we’re not talking about conducting a physical examination with the aim of diagnosing foot pain or other unusual symptoms. It is, of course, the job of our podiatrist, Dr. Adam Mucinskas. What we mean is regularly inspecting your feet for changes or signs that may indicate a developing podiatric problem.

Many toes, foot, and ankle disorders may first manifest with small, subtle signs that, if detected in these early stages, can help you prevent or significantly decrease the severity of a foot problem. For example, patients with diabetes may first notice a loss of sensation or strange tingling or burning in their feet. A progressive condition like a bunion or hammertoe doesn’t suddenly develop overnight. Getting in the habit of regularly inspecting your feet will help you become familiar with what your feet “normally” look like and make it easy to spot any changes. Below are some areas to focus on:

  • Appearance—stand with your feet together and look down at them. Does one foot look more swollen than the other? Do you notice any toes that appear to be moving out of alignment or bending abnormally? Now sit down and look at your feet up close. Do you see any bumps, lumps, or growths? What about unexplained bruises or sores?
  • Skin—the skin on your feet may be trying to tell you something. A bluish tinge, for example, may indicate a circulation problem. Any discoloration or rashes should be monitored. Freckles or moles should be watched for changes in size, shape, color, and borders. These can be signs of skin cancer, which can occur on your feet just like other parts of your body. Be vigilant about moisturizing dry, flaky skin to prevent cracks from developing, which can bleed and provide an entry point for a bacterial infection.
  • Nails—toenails that are discolored, crumbling, or thickening may have a fungal infection. A toenail that turns black may indicate repetitive stress from a sport or shoes that are too small.

If you spot any changes in your toes or feet or start to experience any pain, burning, or numbness anywhere in your feet, it's important that you contact our Cromwell office call 860-632-5499 promptly for evaluation and treatment if necessary.

By Feet First Foot Care Specialists
March 22, 2021
Category: Foot Care
Tags: swollen feet   foot care  

Swelling in your feet or ankles can be annoying, but at Feet First Foot Care Specialists, our Middlesex County patients will often ask if this is a serious problem. The answer isn’t so easy. Swelling can be common when the weather is hot, you’ve been on your feet for too long, or if you’re pregnant. Some patients are also prone to edema—a condition where excess water in the body gets stored in your tissues, causing puffiness and swelling. However, swollen ankles and feet can be a sign of a more concerning condition.

When Swelling Requires Medical Attention

Some possible medical conditions that podiatric swelling may be indicative of include:

  • Infection
  • Injuries—such as a sprain or fracture
  • Kidney disease
  • Liver problems
  • Heart failure
  • Venous insufficiency
  • Diabetes
  • Lymphedema
  • Blood Clot

For this reason, our podiatrist, Dr. Adam Mucinskas, should evaluate any ongoing swelling issues. To make an appointment at our Cromwell office, call 860-632-5499. The foot doctor will want to examine your feet and get your medical history.

In some cases, swelling in your legs, ankles, or feet may require immediate emergency attention.

Seek emergency care right away if any of these other symptoms accompany your swelling:

  • Fever
  • Chest pain, pressure, or tightness
  • Shortness of breath
  • Redness, warmth, or heat in the swollen area
  • If the swelling is just in one limb

Helpful Tips

In general, you can help decrease swelling (not caused by an underlying medical condition) by eating less salt and drinking plenty of water. Avoid standing for long periods. Leg exercises can help too. Try elevating your feet over your heart at the end of the day or laying on the floor with your feet up against a wall. 

As always, if you have unexplained foot or ankle pain or discomfort, please don’t delay. Contact us today at 860-632-5499.

By Feet First Foot Care Specialists
March 15, 2021
Category: foot pain

At Feet First Foot Care Specialists, we are seeing an increase in Middlesex County patients' visits with unexplained foot pain. Patients are particularly puzzled because many of them have been doing very little except working from home and have severely limited their activities due to the COVID restrictions. If you're one of these people, we have one question for you: Are you wearing shoes when you're at home? If you answered no, that might be the cause of your foot pain.

The Problem of Going Barefoot

It’s a common habit for many people to come home at the end of the day and kick their shoes off. Going barefoot or wearing your favorite cozy slippers may seem natural and relaxing, but what about when you’re not “coming home?” If you never leave the house and barefoot has become your daily “shoe” of choice, you may notice your feet don’t feel so good.

Some podiatric disorders that can result from too much time out of shoes include:

  • Plantar Fasciitis—pain in the heel caused by inflammation of the long band of tissue that runs along the bottom of your foot from the heel to toes
  • Metatarsalgia—a sharp or burning pain in the ball of your foot
  • Achilles tendonitis—usually identifiable by pain, aching, or soreness in the back of your lower leg anywhere from the calf to the top of your heel

Why Wearing Shoes Helps

One of the most important ways shoes help prevent the above conditions is by providing your foot with arch support. When your arch flattens as it tends to do when you walk barefoot or wear shoes like slippers or flip flops with no arch support, it places strain on other parts of your foot and leg. It, in turn, leads to inflammation and pain. Besides helping prevent the above conditions, wearing shoes also protect your feet and toes from getting stubbed or banged on hard objects and from cuts or puncture wounds.

If you’re experiencing pain in your toes, feet, ankles, or legs, make an appointment at our Cromwell office for an appointment today by calling 860-632-5499 so our podiatrist, Dr. Adam Mucinskas, can examine your feet and get to the source of your discomfort. In the meantime, put on a good pair of shoes—even if you’re staying home!

By Feet First Foot Care Specialists
March 08, 2021
Category: exercise

March—in like a lion, but here at Feet First Foot Care Specialists, our Middlesex County patients are beginning to see glimpses of the “lamb” with warmer weather and temperatures climbing into the 50’s. Like animals coming out of hibernation, nicer days are an incentive to get outside and start moving. Below are some tips for becoming more active in a way that’s safest for your feet.

Check Your Footwear

Spring is a great time to examine your fitness footwear. Sneakers or shoes that show obvious signs of wear— stretched-out heels, worn down soles, rips—should be replaced. But even if your shoes look fine, the internal components deteriorate, and fitness shoes have a life span, typically of 300-500 miles. If you’re buying new shoes, get your feet professionally measured, as your size can change over time.

Get Your Mosey On

If you’ve spent the better part of the winter on the couch watching Netflix, you’ll want to start slowly and gradually build up your strength and stamina. Walking is a great re-entry exercise you can do at your own pace. Start with 20-30 minutes 4 or 5 days a week and then increase speed and distance over a few weeks. Doing too much too soon can result in overuse injuries like Achilles tendonitis and stress fractures. The standard for most adults is to strive for a minimum of 150 active minutes a week. Be sure to stretch before and after your workout.

Don’t Ignore Foot Pain

If you notice an increase in activity brings pain or discomfort anywhere in your foot and ankle, don’t just chalk it up to the “no pain, no gain” theory of exercise. Consistent pain is your body’s way of telling you something is wrong. It’s best to consult our podiatrist, Dr. Adam Mucinskas, sooner rather than later to determine the source of your discomfort and get it treated promptly to avoid having to put your fitness plans on hold. Contact our Cromwell office for an appointment today by calling 860-632-5499.





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162 West St Ste K
Cromwell, CT 06416